Chemo-cation

There is

something

about the word

summer

that wakes up

our carefree

inner child!

But

Chemotherapy or 

Radiation Therapy

shakes us

into

reality!

Cancer patients don’t get to have

summer vacation…really.

But hey silly,

Summer

is

a state of mind,

as well

as a

season.

YOU

have to make

summer!

Here are a few suggestions for starters:

1. Let the sun shine in

Directions: As your alarm clock beeps in the morning,

stumble to your window and open your curtains, blinds, or shades.

Get back in bed and savor the morning summer sunshine for a few minutes.

It is here longer than any other time of year.

2. Enjoy a lazy long stretch

Directions: Place loose fists up to your neck,

directly under your ears and stretch your elbows up and out,

while arching your back.

Stretch like a cat or a baby, and Yawn, Yawn, Yawn.

Your body will love it and will help you do the rest.

3. Summer Day-Dream

Directions: Take something tangible to therapy that triggers a fond summer memory.

Put it where you can see it or touch it.

During your summer day,

take a break for a day-dream,

close your eyes,

and think of every sense in that summer moment.

What do you hear, taste, smell, see, feel…

What will you bring to daydream about?

Is it a…

Charleston  Chew candy bar

basket of blueberries

tiny jar of sand

rock from a hike

photo of your dog

4. Change up your norm–it’s summer!

Directions: Give yourself permission to lollygag.

a. Read or listen to that book you have been wanting to all year

b. Go for a electronically-naked walk. (A walk with only natural surprises)

c. Buy yourself a treat

d. Bring a sack lunch full of summer foods

and find a fort to enjoy it in.

g. Take time to chat with strangers

Remember

we

 make summer happen!

“It isn’t the great big pleasures

that count the most,

it’s making a great deal

out of the little ones.” –Jean Webster

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2 thoughts on “Chemo-cation

  1. Hi Jennifer,
    I too went through breast cancer. Mine was caught early, widespread DCIS in one breast. I had many biopsies by then in both breasts so we opted for a double mastectomy with immediate tram flap reconstruction, it was actually a free tram flap in that they cut it free. I like you have always been thin so was not sure how they could make breasts but they did. My first surgery was 20 hours, plus two hours in recovery…I was blessed to not have any infections and I flew through my healing without a hitch…they made me too big though and since then I have had them go back and make me smaller. Sometimes I regret too that I had a tram flap as now I can not lift more than 10 pounds or if I can help it. I live on a ranch and have horses so that is hard for me to do as I am so used to doing for myself and now I have to rely on my hubby to saddle my horses:( But I am healthy and I look the same as I did before the cancer. In catching it early my nodes were clear and the cancer was yet contained….the tumor they took out for the biopsy was the size of a small orange…amazing to see it myself as I was awake when they did this in my oncologist’s office as the hospital was too full…both my hubby and I were shocked it was so big and yet I could not feel it. I was happy it was early and that it had not spread.

    I am going to subscribe to your blog….come check me out too…I write mainly about my life here on the ranch that I have lived on for many years. My hubby builds and restores high end collector cars, and hot rods etc. and we put the land into what you call CRP so we do not farm it right now.

    I like your creativity and your web site:):)

    Hugs,
    Hot Rod Cowgirl or Marcy

    1. Hi Marcy,
      Thank you for visiting my blog and sharing your experience. It’s nice to find other people who have gone through some of the same experiences. Your ranch sounds like a lot of fun! I will check out your site. All the best…Jen

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